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Australian Interactive Marketing wants on and offline advertising to tackle child obesity in unison.

Australian Interactive Marketing wants on and offline advertising to tackle child obesity in unison.

Brisbane and Sydney-based sales and marketing specialists baulked at a recent report which demonstrated that the average Australian child will watch over 1,000 junk food adverts on TV this year.

In response, the firm has suggested controlling the time and place of advertising will be vital in rectifying an impending obesity epidemic. While the United Kingdom has taken steps to restrict the marketing of unhealthy food to children amid an obesity epidemic, Australia finds themselves in a similar situation.

According to statistics published by the Royal Children’s Hospital of Melbourne, 94% of teenagers, 67% of primary school children, and 36% of preschoolers have their own mobile screen-based device. The report concludes that many Australian children are exceeding the current national recommended guidelines for screen time.

Australian Interactive Marketing believes it’s easy to see why those statistics, coupled with the fact that digital media is the dominated advertising space for junk food advertising, is causing concern. The firm believes supermarkets also have a role to play in the physical world by stopping products high in fat, sugar and salt from being included in buy-one-get-one-free deals.

“If you combine a consistent message using on and offline channels to a specific target audience, it has real results. While other factors like parenting and governmental regulations also have key roles to play, in-person events targeted to educate children about healthy and balanced diets would do wonders,” stated a spokesperson for Australian Interactive Marketing.

The firm believes that interactions between brands and consumers that occur offline accounts for the most powerful form of marketing. This is why the firm has suggested a combination of restricting television adverts and offline events promoting healthy, balanced diets could be the key to stopping obesity in its tracks.

Indeed, it is the firm’s wish that more educational and health organisations employ offline practices for their marketing ventures, for their critical messages to hit home, and create passionate brand advocates.

Sources:

https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/why-australia-should-restrict-tv-marketing-of-junk-food-ads-targeted-at-children/news-story/d171bbba5d4dc0b6c95a27630f74e895

https://www.rchpoll.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/ACHP-Poll7_Detailed-Report-June21.pdf

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